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Distracted driving prevalent in teen automobile accidents

A study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety on teenager driving behavior may be of interest to California parents and drivers. The report revealed that teenagers engaged in distracted driving prior to accidents more often than previously thought.

In-vehicle event recorders placed in nearly 1,700 vehicles driven by teenagers captured the final seconds leading up to the crashes. When analyzed, these IVERs revealed that the most common forms of distraction were interaction with passengers and using a cellphone. When using a cellphone, teenagers reportedly took their eyes off the road for a full 4 seconds out of the 6 seconds prior to the moment of impact.

The CEO of AAA remarked that diverting attention from the road is more likely to lead to a car accident and that teen drivers are less likely to safely maneuver their vehicles if suddenly faced with dangerous situations. The study says that nearly 90 percent of accidents where a teenager's automobile leaves the roadway are caused by some sort of distraction. Driving while distracted is also the cause of 76 percent of rear-end accidents that involve teenagers.

Drivers who have been involved in a car accident caused by a distracted driver may consider speaking with an attorney to learn what legal actions might be pursued. Injuries suffered in an automobile crash can lead to extensive or long-term medical treatments, including hospitalization and physical therapy. Time spent recuperating from injuries may also hinder an individual from returning to work. Recovering damages for these issues may be possible, and an attorney may be able to provide guidance through this process.

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