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April 2019 Archives

Online study: drivers distracted by memes, other social media

Phones, as most California residents know, are some of the most widespread sources of distraction among drivers. In an online study that involved nearly 2,000 U.S. drivers, 99% named phones as one of the top three distractions. Nearly half of the respondents also said that they make distracted driving their top concern behind the wheel.

Root Insurance: distractions a blind spot for many drivers

Distractions are a blind spot for many drivers in California. The problem is a nationwide one, and a new study from Root Insurance has shed some light on it. Of those surveyed, 47% said they make distractions a top concern when driving, and 99% placed phones among the top three distractions. Yet respondents themselves would use their phones behind the wheel, spending an average of 13 minutes a day on them.

Driver fatigue responsible for many truck accidents

Truckers in California may be interested in research from the Upper Great Plains Transportation Institute, which found that a majority of truck accidents in North Dakota occurred in the state's oil region. This research was spurred by several high-profile accidents along the Highway 23 bypass. The main reason for this problem is thought to be driver fatigue from overwork. While data from the oil region is particularly troublesome, fatigue is a serious issue on roadways all over the country.

Radar analysis measures precipitation risk for car crashes

Researchers have used radar data to determine how precipitation can affect the risk for fatal highway crashes. California residents should know that the results of this study are more precise than those of previous studies, which would rely on police reports or field observations to determine if there was precipitation at the time of a crash.

IIHS: new pickups less safe for passengers than for drivers

California residents who own a newer pickup truck should know that there may be a discrepancy between drivers-side safety and passengers-side safety. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety began crash testing both sides in 2017, and after a round of crash tests involving 11 newer two-row pickups, it discovered that passengers are indeed at a higher risk for injuries or death than drivers.