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Pedestrian deaths continue to rise

California residents may be surprised to learn that, on average, 13 people die every day around the country just from walking around on local streets. In fact, approximately 4,880 people died in 2014 after being hit by cars. It is argued that poor infrastructure causes pedestrian deaths as streets are designed to allow vehicles to travel fast without offering protection for those walking on foot.

A report from Smart Growth America showed that pedestrian deaths were more likely to occur in poorer neighborhoods. Additionally, the elderly, those who did not have health insurance and people of color were more likely to be affected by pedestrian car accidents. The report also found that Florida was the most dangerous state as it has seven of the top-10 most dangerous metropolitan areas for pedestrians. The Cape Coral-Fort Myers area was considered to be the most dangerous place for walkers in the United States.

To prevent pedestrian accidents, cities should have streets that have full sidewalks, refuge islands, restricted right turns on red lights for vehicles and pedestrian countdown signals. The data shows that metropolitan areas that embrace this street design are becoming more safer; however, those areas that do not are getting much more dangerous.

Pedestrians who are seriously injured in a serious accident could potentially face expensive medical costs in addition to being unable to work. If it can be determined that the victim had the right of way or that the driver of the vehicle involved was negligent in some other fashion, an attorney could seek compensation for the losses that have been sustained through the filing of a lawsuit against the motorist.

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